Age Group Descriptions and Rules

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Hot Shots runs from early September to late October. Sessions are held on Saturday mornings and consist of three time slots of about 1 hour each. Participants would be in one of those time slots at 8:30, 9:30, or 10:30 am and all sessions are held at the Hot Shots fields at Sweet Air Park. Each participant will receive a Size 3 soccer ball as a part of their registration fee.

Sweet Air ParkHot Shots soccer is an entry level, clinic style program for boys and girls who have turned 4 by the start of our soccer season. Teams focus on ball handling skills and basic rules of soccer (kicking, passing, hands free, sidelines, overhead throws, positions). The first 3-4 weeks consist of skills and drills and progress to mini-games for the remainder of the season.

CMRC utilizes Coerver United to provide training for the Hot Shots age group. To find out more about their training method used across the globe visit their website.

Hot Shots continue to rely on the great volunteer “coaches” that sign up to be on field with the players. WITHOUT VOLUNTEER “coaches” teams cannot be formed and the season will be delayed, and/or teams will be very large decreasing the amount of learning and fun for participants. We strongly encourage you to consider volunteering upon registration. No soccer skills or knowledge is necessary. Just follow the lead of the Coerver Trainer. This enables us as a volunteer organization to have the program and enhance the experience of every participant.

You can direct your questions about Hot Shots to CMRChotshots@gmail.com.

Coerver United Training has provided an overview of a typical session.  Please review and let us know if you have questions:

Below is the Outline for the Coerver First Skills Program:

1. Scrimmage (8-10 Minutes) The goal of this is for our young players to experience the game as soon as they get to training. Players are usually so excited to start that if you start with a scrimmage, it allows them time to experience the game and burn some energy. It also allows time for those late arriving families to jump in and not miss skill work or instruction.

2. Skill Box (10-15 Minutes) Players will learn control dribble (Turtle Dribble) and speed dribble (Cheetah Dribble). Players will be taught to dribble with their laces and outside of the foot. We will teach other skills like boxes and toe touches. The final piece will be the Coerver Move of the Day.

3. Fun Game (5-8 Minutes) Game will be fun and encourage players to use the Coerver Move of the Day.

4. 1v1 Game (5-8 Minutes) Game will be goal oriented and will encourage players to use Coerver Move of the Day.

5. Shooting (5 Minutes) Focus on proper shooting technique. (Striking the ball with your laces, not your TOES!)

6. Scrimmage

Registration for U8 girls and boys Rec soccer will open annually in late May.  As in prior years this will be a 4v4 small sided game.  Rules can be found below.

In the U8 Boys and Girls programs practices are held one night per week for about an hour (M, T, W, or Th. typically at 6 or 7 pm) and Saturdays (between 9 am and noon) until games start around mid-September. Once games start, they are held on Saturday mornings typically between 9 and noon, and the weeknight practice continues. The night of the week is chosen by the volunteer coach or the vote of the parents on the team. Monday night is not usually chosen for practices, but it is possible.

The best way to know what night your team will practice is to volunteer to be the coach! To volunteer just select “coach” under the volunteer tab when you register or email the age group commissioner found on the contacts page of this website.

Registration will be open through the summer and close July 31.  We plan to have an evaluation night and details will be shared once that is firmed up.  If you have other questions or wish to volunteer please contact our age group commissioner at cmrcsocceru8commis@gmail.com.

SPORTSMANSHIP:

Players, coaches and spectators are expected to act in the nature of good sportsmanship at all times. Abuse of the referees will not be tolerated.  All teams benches will be on the inside sideline and no parents or spectators are to be on this side during game nor should they stand or sit on the end lines. 

FIVE YARD RULE:

In all dead ball situations, defending players must stand at least five yards away from the ball. If the defensive player’s goal area is closer than five yards, the ball shall be placed five yards from the goal area in line with the place of the penalty.

THROW INS:

The ball shall be thrown into play from the sideline. Players will be given at least 2 attempts to perform a proper throw in and then a change of possession can occur if a significant advantage is gained by an intentional illegal throw in. The referee and coaches should teach and encourage the players to try to throw the ball in with two hands on the ball while it goes back behind the head and then comes forward releasing the ball into play. Both feet must remain on the ground outside the field of play while throwing the ball. The Throw In should be directed at to teammates feet.

NO OFFSIDES and NO SLIDE TACKLING:

If a player is sliding for the ball, contact with any player(s) from the other team is NOT ALLOWED. If a player slides and contact is initiated, a free kick shall be awarded. This does not prevent players from sliding to stop/intercept a ball where contact is not initiated during the slide. Example: a player may slide to save a ball from going out-of-bounds.

GOALS & GOAL BOX:

  • The goal box is directly in front of the goal.
  • No player may touch the ball with in the goal box, however any player may move through the goal box via pass.
  • Any part of the ball or player’s body on the line is considered in the goal box; the player is an extension of the box.
  • If a defender touches the ball in the goal box we have allowed for one warning per team. Additional infractions result in a penalty kick from the bottom arc of the midfield circle. The defense and any offensive players not taking penalty kick must wait behind midfield center line. No defensive walls can be formed by the opposing team players. Penalty kicks are dead ball infractions. If a goal is not scored, the defense obtains possession with a goal kick.
  • If an offensive player touches the ball within the goal box, a goal kick is awarded to the defensive team.
  • If the ball comes to a complete stop in the goal box, regardless of which team touched it last, a goal kick is awarded to the defensive team.

GOAL SCORING:

A goal may only be scored from a touch (offensive or defensive) within the team’s offensive half on the field. The ball must be completely on the offensive half of the field, and cannot be touching the mid-line (Example: kick-off). If a player in their defensive half kicks the ball across the midline and the ball hits another player (offensive or defensive) in their offensive half, and the ball goes in the goal, a goal will be awarded. If a ball is kicked from the defensive half and is not touched before the ball rests in the goal, a goal kick is awarded to the defensive team. A goal cannot be scored from an indirect kick, such as a kick-in from out-of-bounds.

DURATION:

Four, 8 minute quarters with a two minute break between each quarter including half-time.  Teams will change ends after half-time.

Games should start no later than Five minutes after scheduled start time.  Allow for a brief warm-up and set-up of goals.  Duration of these games should allow for plenty of time for these to take place without delay.

Registration for U10 girls and boys Rec soccer will open annually in late May. As in prior years this will be a 7v7 format with added Built out lines. Rules can be found below.

In the U10 Boys and Girls programs practices are held one night per week for about an hour (M, T, W, or Th. typically at 6 or 7 pm) and Saturdays (between 9 am and noon) until games start around mid-September. Once games start, they are held on Saturday mornings typically between 9 and noon, and the weeknight practice continues. The night of the week is chosen by the volunteer coach or the vote of the parents on the team. Monday night is not usually chosen for practices, but it is possible.

The best way to know what night your team will practice is to volunteer to be the coach! To volunteer just select “coach” under the volunteer tab when you register or email the age group commissioner found on the contacts page of this website.

Registration will be open through the summer and close July 31.  We plan to have an evaluation night and details will be shared once it is finalized. If you have other questions or wish to volunteer please contact our age group commissioner at cmrcsoccerboysu10commis@gmail.com.

To give a wider variety of competition and to help keep local rec programs afloat CMRC has in the past and will likely continue to participate in a cooperative game schedule with other local rec councils in the immediate area. These rec programs also have a limited number of rec players to form teams. Please be aware that because of this co-op there may be some limited travel to other local soccer fields to play games against those rec teams. (i.e. Cockeysville) We are pleased to be teaming up with several neighboring rec programs to enhance the team pool and opportunities for competitive play.

U10 7v7 Rules Guide

Build Out Line

  • The build out line promotes playing the ball out of the back in a less pressured setting
  • When the goalkeeper has the ball, either during play (from the opponent) or from a goal kick, the opposing team must move behind the build out line until the ball is put into play
  • Once the opposing team is behind the build out line, the goalkeeper can pass, throw or roll the ball into play (punting is not allowed)
  • After the ball is put into play by the goalkeeper, and the ball has left the penalty box, the opposing team can cross the build out line and play resumes as normal
  • If a goalkeeper punts the ball, an indirect free kick should be awarded to the opposing team from the spot of the offense
  • If the punt occurs within the goal area, the indirect free kick should be taken on the goal area line parallel to the goal line at the nearest point to where the infringement occurred
  • The build out line will also be used to denote where offside offenses can be called
  • Players cannot be penalized for an offside offense between the halfway line and the build out line
  • Players can be penalized for an offside offense between the build out line and goal line

Offsides Infringements/Sanctions

For any offside offence, the referee awards an indirect free kick to the opposing team to be taken from the place where the infringement occurred.

No Offsides Offence

There is no offside offence if a player receives the ball directly from:

  • a goal kick or
  • a throw-in or
  • a corner kick

Substitutions

Teams can only substitute at goal-kicks (for either team), after goals (for either team), and after a throw-in is called (the team that gets the throw-in). Referees may allow the other team to “piggy back” on substitutions after throw-ins, but that is entirely their call.

Teams cannot substitute without the specific approval of the referee. All substitutions must take place at the halfway line.

Direct and Indirect Freekick

Direct Kick

A direct kick is awarded to the opposing team if a player commits any of the following seven offences in a manner considered by the referee to be careless, reckless or using excessive force:

  • Kicks or attempts to kick an opponent
  • Trips or attempts to trip an opponent
  • Jumps at an opponent
  • Charges an opponent
  • Strikes or attempts to strike an opponent
  • Pushes an opponent
  • Tackles an opponent

A direct kick is also awarded to the opposing team if a player commits any of the following three offences:

  • Holds an opponent
  • Spits at an opponent
  • Handles the ball deliberately (except for the goalkeeper within his/her own penalty area)

A direct kick is taken from where the offence occurred. The ball must be stationary when the kick is taken and the kicker must not touch the ball again until it has touched another player.

The referee indicates a direct kick by pointing his/her arm forward. The referee does not have to keep his/her arm in that position, unlike an indirect kick which will be discussed further down.

If a direct kick is kicked directly into the opponent’s goal, a goal is awarded. If, for some weird reason, a direct kick is kicked directly into your team’s own goal, a corner kick is awarded to the opposing team.

Indirect Kick

An indirect kick is awarded to the opposing team if a goalkeeper, inside his own penalty area, commits any of the following offences:

  • Touches the ball again with his/her hands after he/she has released it from possession and before it has touched another player
  • Touches the ball with his/her hands after it has been deliberately kicked to him/her by a teammate
  • Touches the ball with his/her hands after he/she has received it directly from a throw-in by a teammate.

An indirect kick is also awarded to the opposing team if, in the opinion of the referee, a player:

  • Plays in a dangerous manner
  • Impedes the progress of an opponent
  • Prevents the goalkeeper from releasing the ball from his/her hands
  • Commits any other offence, not previously mentioned with the direct kick rule, for which play is stopped to caution or send off a player

An indirect kick is taken from the place where the offence occurred. The ball must be stationary when the kick is taken and the kicker must not touch the ball again until it has touched another player.

The referee indicates an indirect kick by raising his/her arm in the air. He/she maintains his/her arm in that position until the kick has been taken and the ball has touched another player or goes out of play.

A goal can be scored from an indirect kick only if the ball touches another player before it enters the goal. If an indirect kick is kicked directly into the opponents’ goal, a goal kick is awarded. If, for some weird reason, an indirect kick is kicked directly into your team’s own goal, a corner kick is awarded to the opposing team.

Deliberate heading of the ball is not allowed in U11 games. 

If a player deliberately heads the ball in a game, an indirect free kick should be awarded to the opposing team from the spot of the offense. If the deliberate header occurs within the goal area, the indirect free kick should be taken on the goal area line parallel to the goal line at the nearest point to where the infringement occurred. 

Pregame check of proper footwear and shin protection.  No metal studs or cleats.  All participants must wear shin guards.

Registration for U12 girls and boys Rec soccer will open annually in late May.  As in prior years this will be a 9v9 format. Rules can be found below.

In the U10 Boys and Girls programs practices are held one night per week for about an hour (M, T, W, or Th. typically at 6 or 7 pm) and Saturdays (between 9 am and noon) until games start around mid-September. Once games start, they are held on Saturday mornings typically between 9 and noon, and the weeknight practice continues. The night of the week is chosen by the volunteer coach or the vote of the parents on the team. Monday night is not usually chosen for practices, but it is possible.

The best way to know what night your team will practice is to volunteer to be the coach! To volunteer just select “coach” under the volunteer tab when you register or email the age group commissioner found on the contacts page of this website.

Registration will be open through the summer and close July 31.  We plan to have an evaluation night and details will be shared once it is finalized. If you have other questions or wish to volunteer please contact our age group commissioner at cmrcsoccerboysu12commis@gmail.com.

To give a wider variety of competition and to help keep local rec programs afloat CMRC has in the past and will likely continue to participate in a cooperative game schedule with other local rec councils in the immediate area. These rec programs also have a limited number of rec players to form teams. Please be aware that because of this co-op there may be some limited travel to other local soccer fields to play games against those rec teams. (i.e. Cockeysville) We are pleased to be teaming up with several neighboring rec programs to enhance the team pool and opportunities for competitive play.

Substitutions

Teams can only substitute at goal-kicks (for either team), after goals (for either team), and after a throw-in is called (the team that gets the throw-in). Referees may allow the other team to “piggy back” on substitutions after throw-ins, but that is entirely their call.

Teams cannot substitute without the specific approval of the referee. All substitutions must take place at the halfway line.

Direct and Indirect Freekick

Direct Kick

A direct kick is awarded to the opposing team if a player commits any of the following seven offences in a manner considered by the referee to be careless, reckless or using excessive force:

  • Kicks or attempts to kick an opponent
  • Trips or attempts to trip an opponent
  • Jumps at an opponent
  • Charges an opponent
  • Strikes or attempts to strike an opponent
  • Pushes an opponent
  • Tackles an opponent

A direct kick is also awarded to the opposing team if a player commits any of the following three offences:

  • Holds an opponent
  • Spits at an opponent
  • Handles the ball deliberately (except for the goalkeeper within his/her own penalty area)

A direct kick is taken from where the offence occurred. The ball must be stationary when the kick is taken and the kicker must not touch the ball again until it has touched another player.

The referee indicates a direct kick by pointing his/her arm forward. The referee does not have to keep his/her arm in that position, unlike an indirect kick which will be discussed further down.

If a direct kick is kicked directly into the opponent’s goal, a goal is awarded. If, for some weird reason, a direct kick is kicked directly into your team’s own goal, a corner kick is awarded to the opposing team.

Indirect Kick

An indirect kick is awarded to the opposing team if a goalkeeper, inside his own penalty area, commits any of the following offences:

  • Touches the ball again with his/her hands after he/she has released it from possession and before it has touched another player
  • Touches the ball with his/her hands after it has been deliberately kicked to him/her by a teammate
  • Touches the ball with his/her hands after he/she has received it directly from a throw-in by a teammate.

An indirect kick is also awarded to the opposing team if, in the opinion of the referee, a player:

  • Plays in a dangerous manner
  • Impedes the progress of an opponent
  • Prevents the goalkeeper from releasing the ball from his/her hands
  • Commits any other offence, not previously mentioned with the direct kick rule, for which play is stopped to caution or send off a player

An indirect kick is taken from the place where the offence occurred. The ball must be stationary when the kick is taken and the kicker must not touch the ball again until it has touched another player.

The referee indicates an indirect kick by raising his/her arm in the air. He/she maintains his/her arm in that position until the kick has been taken and the ball has touched another player or goes out of play.

A goal can be scored from an indirect kick only if the ball touches another player before it enters the goal. If an indirect kick is kicked directly into the opponents’ goal, a goal kick is awarded. If, for some weird reason, an indirect kick is kicked directly into your team’s own goal, a corner kick is awarded to the opposing team.

Offside

Offside Position

It is not an offence in itself to be in an offside position. A player is in an offside position if:

  • he is nearer to his opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second last opponent

A player is not in an offside position if:

  • he is in his own half of the field of play or
  • he is level with the second last opponent or
  • he is level with the last two opponents

Offence

A player in an offside position is only penalized if, at the moment the ball touches or is played by one of his team, he is, in the opinion of the referee, involved in active play by:

  • interfering with play or
  • interfering with an opponent or
  • gaining an advantage by being in that position

No Offence

There is no offside offence if a player receives the ball directly from:

  • a goal kick or
  • a throw-in or
  • a corner kick

Infringements/Sanctions

For any offside offence, the referee awards an indirect free kick to the opposing team to be taken from the place where the infringement occurred.

Deliberate heading of the ball is not allowed in U12 games.  

If a player deliberately heads the ball in a game, an indirect free kick should be awarded to the opposing team from the spot of the offense. If the deliberate header occurs within the goal area, the indirect free kick should be taken on the goal area line parallel to the goal line at the nearest point to where the infringement occurred. 

Pregame check of proper footwear and shin protection.  No metal studs or cleats.  All participants must wear shin guards.  Introduce yourselves to the coaches from each team and ask if they have questions about the rules.

Duration

Two 25 minute halves.  Games should start no later than 5 minutes after scheduled start time.  Allow for brief warm-up but teams should be doing this prior and be ready to go.

Registration for U14 girls and boys Rec soccer will open annually in late May.  As in prior years this will be a 11v11 format.

In the U14 Boys and Girls programs practices are held one night per week for about an hour (M, T, W, or Th. typically at 6 or 7 pm) and Saturdays (between 9 am and noon) until games start around mid-September. Once games start, they are held on Saturday mornings typically between 9 and noon, and the weeknight practice continues. The night of the week is chosen by the volunteer coach or the vote of the parents on the team. Monday night is not usually chosen for practices, but it is possible.

The best way to know what night your team will practice is to volunteer to be the coach! To volunteer just select “coach” under the volunteer tab when you register or email the age group commissioner found on the contacts page.

Registration will be open through the summer and close July 31.  We plan to have an evaluation night and details will be shared once it is finalized. If you have other questions or wish to volunteer please contact our age group commissioner at  cmrcsoccerboysu12commis@gmail.com.

To give a wider variety of competition and to help keep local rec programs afloat CMRC has in the past and will likely continue to participate in a cooperative game schedule with other local rec councils in the immediate area. These rec programs also have a limited number of rec players to form teams. Please be aware that because of this co-op there may be some limited travel to other local soccer fields to play games against those rec teams. (i.e. Cockeysville) We are pleased to be teaming up with several neighboring rec programs to enhance the team pool and opportunities for competitive play.

Policies

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Since Soccer is an outdoor sport, it is unavoidable that the weather will get in the way from time to time. A little rain will not harm anybody, and will rarely be the reason for cancellations.

The Soccer Program has the overall responsibility for both players and fields; however, on a day-to-day basis, the responsibility for the players is delegated to the individual coaches. Hence, whether or not your team will train when it rains, or when it is hot, is a decision made by your coach. You, as a parent, should take the necessary precautions for your players under the different weather conditions you are likely to face.

You should always apply common sense to any weather situation!

When it comes to the fields, the Soccer Program will weigh up the impracticability of canceling matches against the wear and tear of the fields. Again, a little bit of rain is not a problem, but heavy rain, or consecutive days of rain, means that we may be forced to close some, or all, of the fields. When we do that, you will be able to see it on any of the pages on our website, on the top of the page. On Saturdays, we will inspect the fields in the morning, and post to the website if some, or all, of the fields are closed. If possible, we will also send an email out to everybody about cancellations. The inspection will take place around 7AM, and the result will be published before 7:30AM, if technically possible (obviously, if the Phoenix area has been blacked out because of severe overnight thunderstorms, floods, or other natural disasters, we might not be able to access the website).

One thing that you must be aware of is the thunderstorm rules: At the FIRST crack of thunder, you MUST stop your match (or training exercise) and leave the fields! Play, or training, CANNOT be commenced until 30 minutes after the last thunder crack. No exceptions!

Background Checks

Baltimore County Government is invested in increasing the safety of participants and families while they are participating in Recreation and Parks activities and programs. This commitment is extending our efforts to include conducting background investigations for all volunteers who participate in Recreation/Nature Council, Therapeutic, PAL, and other County sponsored recreation programs.

The background investigation will be conducted by a nationally recognized security screening firm, the Southeastern Security Consultants, Inc (SSCI). This screening is a review of each applicant’s criminal history.

The results of the screening will determine each volunteer’s eligibility to volunteer in our programs. To protect the privacy of all volunteers in the program, Baltimore County staff will not have access to any information regarding this background screening. SSCI will only provide a list of passed applicants to Recreation and Parks staff.

This program is a preventive measure. It is not meant to take the place of parental involvement and participation. It is meant to work in partnership with parental efforts to ensure that their children and all constituents enjoy programs and activities in a safe environment.

The Access Code you are asked for when you fill in your application is BCGRec18.

Thank you for your cooperation. Access the screening here.

Also, please review Baltimore County Rec’s Facility Rules of Behavior as well as the Parent’s Code of Conduct.